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20110701
20110731
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
that you were present at a meeting with scotland yard when police officers provided you with evidence that your newspaper was interfering with justice. he particularly mentions the name of another senior executive and at the meeting a man from metropolitan police, that "news of the world" were guilty of interference and attempt to credit -- discredit a police officer and his wife. can you tell us more about that meeting? >> well, i can tell you something about it but it's -- i was asked to recall a meeting that i had at scotland yard in 2002. i was asked recently, i think by channel 4, about the story you're referring to. my information -- my recollection of that meeting was entirely different. my recollection of the meeting was on a completely different subject so i'm only going on what i was told by channel 4. they say it's a meeting in november but that's what was put to me. i checked my diary as much as possible and there was no meeting in november. however, there was a subsequent meeting and in very early january, so it may be that it was that meeting. that was not my recollectio
volume of information that was extremely useful to scotland yard and in return mr. philbeck received information from the police computer -- >> well, i don't know about that, and most journalists who work as a crime editor or a crime correspondents have a working relationship with that their particular police force. >> when our report was published in early 2010, was when you were chief executive of "news international" and there was certain things where obviously we, a reporter we have found that the evidence from the people of "news international" was wholly unsatisfactory and the amnesia and inconceivable that clyde was a rogue reporter as have been passed on to us, and that we referred to the neville e-mail in there, and awe -- all of that kind of stuff, and when you were chief executive of "news international" at the time that the report was published, did you read the report? >> yes, i did. i'm not saying i read every single word of it, but i read a large majority of it and i particularly read the criticisms addressed to the company, and i can only hope that from the evidence t
development, scotland yard released a statement accusing unnamed individuals of trying to sabotage its investigation. part of that probe involves allegations that murdoch journalists paid bribes to police for information. rescuers in russia searched a huge reservoir on the volga river today, after a cruise boat sank on sunday. at least 55 people were killed, with 79 rescued and dozens more missing. it happened about 450 miles east of moscow, in windy, rainy conditions. the boat sank in just eight minutes. today, debris was visible in the water as search boats looked for victims and survivors. families stood by, hoping for news. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: and we turn to africa where a nation is born, but with many troubles. at midnight friday in juba, the capital of the new south sudan, this sign said it all: "free at last". the turning of the clock to july 9, saturday, meant independence, and the creation of the world's newest nation. >> i am sending good luck to all the southern sudanese. >> woodruff: but the jubilation in the streets of
-ranking officers of scotland yard part of the original investigation in to news of the world were themselves victims of hacking. the allegations raising new questions about their handling of the case and they feared reprisals from the paper. the officers will appear at a hearing on that today. >>> wow. so have we heard -- have we heard any response from murdock's people? about these are overblown, they're not true? because you know what, again we've seen before where things are swept up. >> absolutely. especially in london. >> it's a storm, the london tabloids. and you sit there and go, i wonder if this is much to do about nothing down the road. but for the fact that i'm not really hearing a response from news corp. they're usually the most aggressive pitbulls. i mean, i always -- you look at their pr staff, they're remarkable. you sit there in wonderment. but they're completely silent. i'm thinking, wow, where there's smoke, there might be a lot of fire. >> they responded this morning to great britain. they responded by obviously the closure of the -- >> yeah, obviously. >> they responded.
you something about it. i was asked to recall the meeting at scotland yard in 2002. i was off recently by channel 4 about the story. my information, my recollection of that meeting was entirely different. my recollection is the meeting was on a completely different subject. i am only going on what i was told by channel 4. the meeting in november, that was what was put to me. i checked my diary as much as possible. no meeting in november. but subsequently, very early january it may be that meeting was not my recollection of the meeting. on the other hand, i did have some regular meetings. >> rupert murdoch said he relied on lieutenants that he trusted. who would you trust? >> the news room at any newspaper is trust. if you think about -- i am sure paul farrelly would agree. think about way a story gets published it depends on trust. you rely on people that work for you to behave in a proper manner and you rely on the information you are given at the time. that is why i am with the committee today about the interception of milly dowler's voicemail not commenting on what other people knew
people have been arrested but it may not end there. scotland yard believes the investigation will continue to grow and along with it the pressure on rupert murdoch's media empire. >> that was stephanie gosk. >> the real story there and willie touched on it, hugh grant has looked the same for 20 years. before knotting hill -- >> doesn't get work done. >> there was -- he did "about a boy", i like that one but he got old there then he got young again. i don't know how that happens. he's looking good. isn't that the story, the best analysis you've heard this morning. >> i would like to follow up with simon. >> you know who else hasn't aged? >> who? >> i remember watching him and it was in '63, the beatles still a year away but simon hobbs known as the ed sullivan of great britain, he hasn't aged a year. >> it's extraordinary, it's in the british genes. good morning. you know the germans have a word, it's called -- >> what are you upset about today? >> the germans have a word it's taking place here at other people's misfortune. in business terms, you know, you cut through really w
's a reality, isn't it? it's reality, if you look at it. they figured out how to wire scotland yard and parliament and 10 downing street. rupert murdock has been for some time, the most powerful man in britain. >> when you see this frail man yesterday objectly incapable of following the facts, unable to remember the names and certain facts, well, i'm afraid there was something on the part of journalists. they know him to be aggressive, particular, specific. remember, i was mentioning earlier in piers morgan's diaries, he worked for rupert murdock for 18 months and he rang him every week of every month for 18 months. >> martin -- >> yes he says he knew nothing. >> are you surprised more questions haven't been raised about the passage from peer morgan's book where he talks about phone hacking and brags about how you can do it? >> no, i'm not surprised. he doesn't say he does it. what he says in the book, if you read it carefully, this is important. he said, he heard about this phenomena and he therefore personally changed his own cell phone numbers in order to prevent that from happen
were bought and sold. scotland yard got testy today claiming people were trying to leak allegations that the "news of the world" tried to get phone numbers to members of the royal family by bribing police officer. richard watson now from the police. >> once again the ethics which should underpin the relationship between police and journalists is under scrutiny. as never before. when it works, cops need publicity to help them investigate. but a sort of allegations in recent days shows the darker side. >> any journalist work is sold -- sensitive information. that's what excludes them. but clearly there is a line that can't be crossed, and today's news as a member of the royal protection squad has allegedly passed on information for return for cash to come is yet another profound shock. >> personal protection officers travel in the same car as the royals. close protection officers in backup vehicles. others guard buildings. the bbc was told today that the notion of the "news of the world" former royal editor asked his editor who went on to work for the p.m. for 1000 pounds to be paid t
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)

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